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4. Industrial Design

The LED Lamp was designed to project an image of solidity and robustness. With and all-metal design and a total weight of 21kg, the LED Lamp does not fail to impress in this respect. All parts are custom-machined from solid aluminum, with the exception of steel rotating joints, gas springs, chrome tubing, and steel screws.

In its most compact position, the structure is dimensioned at 30 cm (12 inches) in width, 58 cm (23 inches) in height, and 69 cm (27 inches) in depth. When fully extended, it can reach up to 91 cm (36 inches) in width having both shades opened to form a 180o angle between them; 114 cm (45 inches) in height when shades are facing the viewer or wall; and 89 cm (35 inches) in depth, extending 46 cm (18 inches) beyond the front of the base. These positions follow the range of possible use cases, including overhead lighting of a desk-space environment, and wall projection for ambient information displays or light projection for sound response.

Figure 1.14
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Figure 1.15: Typical position
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Figure 1.16: Maximum vertical height - both gas springs extended
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Figure 1.17: Both arms extended outwards.
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Figure 1.18: Maximum horizontal depth
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Figure 1.19: Both gas springs contracted
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Most of the Lamp's weight in consumed in the elliptical base, thus allowing the lighter upper construction to extend freely, while maintaining adequate balance, even when influenced by additional external forces. The shape of the base follows the overall proportions of the lamp - because legs and arms extend further towards the front than the sides, an elliptical shape balances the resulting weight distribution.

Figure 1.20
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The upper body is divided into sections of legs and arms that are conjoined by steel joints, allowing for motion in one degree of freedom each. The sections are designed to mimic the types of positions most useful for a tables/desk/projection lamp. The lower leg is firmly mounted to the elliptical base and attached interface. The upper leg is joined with the lower leg using the first rotating joint. The rotating joint allows for vertical pose changes, in particular for extending the upper body towards the front. In addition to the rotating joint, a gas spring is mounted between the two legs. It satisfies two functions: 1. it restricts the possible extension of the upper body to within safe limits given the weight distribution; 2. it serves to dampen the downward (gravitational) movement of the upper body, when the pose is changes. While designed to be within reasonable range, the weight of upper body and its variable force depending on arm position may be challenging.

Figure 1.21
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The upper leg is attached to a cylindrical interface via a second joint, which allows for vertical pose changes mostly affecting the angle of light projection (downwards versus wall-oriented). A smaller gas spring is mounted between upper leg and the interface, once again restricting range of positions and providing safety due to weight considerations. The interface in turn attaches to two arms via a third and fourth joint. These two joints allow for lateral pose changes.

Figure 1.22
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Figure 1.23
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Figure 1.24
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Except for the power supply, the electronic components have been placed within the body of the Lamp. Ethernet and power interfaces are located inside the rear of the base. Microprocessors for user interface control and power level conversion ICs are also located inside the base behind the touchpad UI. The interface microprocessor in the base is connected to the LED shades via serial communication wires. Along with power wires, they run along tunnels within arms and legs. In areas of joints, chrome flexible tubing serves to bridge gaps and further protect and shield the wires.

Figure 1.25
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Figure 1.26
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Figure 1.27
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Figure 1.28
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Figure 1.29
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Each shade houses an aluminum dome (made from an aluminum ladle). The dome has been prepared to house LEDs in 252 holes, arranged in a hexagonally symmetric formation. The concave side shows the LED lenses, whereas the convex side of the dome features their wiring and microprocessors for serial signal conversion.

Figure 1.30
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Overall, the design is intended to create a well-rounded and compact feeling, projecting robustness, while allowing reasonable maneuvering, and portraying mechanical intricacies, while not including extraneous, non-functional design items.